Dear God. If in the End

Dear God. If in the End we had no internet no hot water in the kettle no books riddled with notes or bedclothes yellowed by the lamplight If in the end you were as close to me as I am to knowing every star, marking each with naked eye, reciting cinematic names and vectors If…

Ghost children, empathy, and easter. 3 Monday quotes.

I’ve lately been reading a wide swath of whatever, and apparently refusing to share any of it because… cohesion. So in lieu of a blog post that would make all these come elegantly together, below are the quotes I’m saving from a few works that may or may not be awesome on the whole: From Education’s culture of…

The Myths that Sustain Oppression, Income Inequality, and Poverty

Okay friends. Given recent battles over minimum wage, all the news regarding the 50-year anniversary of Johnson’s “War on Poverty,” and political statements that examine  poverty and income inequality, I present to you this eerily relevant excerpt from Paulo Freiro’s celebrated Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 1968: [O]ppressors develop a series of methods precluding any presentation of the world as a…

opiates, meaning, and asking the wrong questions

So The Atlantic posted a health column today with the following title: Where Life Has Meaning: Poor, Religious Countries. It’s a writeup of a recent study published in Psychological Science about the quest for meaning around the globe. The grabby tag: “Research indicates that lack of religion is a key reason why people in wealthy countries don’t…

Silencing the News about (Over)Consumption

In a January 4 SF Gate article, Carolyn Lochhead raises creepy, blasphemous questions, like: Can the earth sustain the (misguided) notion that a healthy economy must grow – constantly and indefinitely? Can we trade “having stuff” for a better way of life? Can we share resources — cars, power tools, etc — rather than approaching everything…

“I’m interested in the emotions underneath these rituals, not the specifics”

As a complement to my earlier post, here’s a quote from Alain de Botton’s Dec 23 article for The Guardian, in which he describes how secular thinkers might take advantage of aspects of Christmas: “We live in a crowded but lonely world. The public spaces in which we typically encounter others – commuter trains, jostling pavements – conspire…

“Peace on Earth”

For the Mess, for the palpable grappling with failure, for the sting in some of the carols that are bludgeoning speakers today — essentially, for the “rest of us” — Jesus this song you wrote The words are sticking in my throat “Peace on Earth” Hear it every Christmas time But hope and history won’t…